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Biomass Power Map Sneak Peek

The 2012 U.S. Biomass Power Map is complete and the most positive development compared with the previous map is the increase in the number of plants that are currently under construction, which rose from six to 15.
By Rona Johnson | October 14, 2011

The 2012 U.S. Biomass Power Map is complete and the most positive development compared with the previous map is the increase in the number of plants that are currently under construction, which rose from six to 15.

Although some of those plants were just added this year, it’s still a pretty impressive increase. I would imagine that the end of the year deadline for the U.S. Treasury’s 1603 program may have had something to do with that increase.

Even though the number of proposed plants decreased compared with the previous map, it’s mainly because many of them are now under construction and were moved to the operational list. And, as is always the case, some proposed projects have dropped off the map.

The current map lists a total of 39 proposed biomass plants and proposed conversions, compared with 49 on the spring 2011 map, and 161 operational, under construction and idled plants, compared with 147 on the spring map.

California continues to be the state with the most biomass power facilities followed by Florida, New York, New Hampshire, Maine, Michigan, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Oregon.

The map lists biomass power facilities that use solid biomass fuel to produce 1 MW or more of power and supply all or a portion of that power to the grid. Also included are plants converting or proposing to convert to biomass, coal plants cofiring or planning to cofire with biomass, proposed plants and plants under construction.   

Some of you are probably wondering why this map is called the “2012” map, instead of the fall 2011 map, but that’s not a typo. BBI International has decided that rather than doing two biomass power maps a year, next year we are going to publish a pellet mill map and a biomass power map.

The map is sent out with your free subscription to Biomass Power & Thermal, and will be mailed with the November issue. If you are not currently a subscriber, you can subscribe by visiting our website at www.biomassmagazine.com.

 

1 Responses

  1. C Herndon

    2011-10-24

    1

    I have a way to make an alternative fuel additive, an octane booster from Kudzu. We need to have a law passed allowing people to cultivate kudzu in farms to have the kudzu we need to make this product. How do we do this? Mainly in the southeast USA.

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