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CEC awards $6 million to anaerobic digestion project

By Erin Voegele | June 14, 2012

The California Energy Commission has selected Clean World Partners LLC to receive a $6 million grant to support a biogas and bioenergy project. The funding will enable the expansion of the company’s Sacramento project from a capacity of 25 tons per day to 100 tons per day.  

The grant was awarded on June 13, only days after the Sacramento project’s June 7 groundbreaking. The initial scope of the project called for Clean World Partners’ Organic Waste Recycling Center at the Sacramento-based South Area Transfer Station to convert 25 tons of food waste per day into biogas in a high solids anaerobic digestion system. Food waste that enters the reactor will be collected by Atlas Disposal from area food processing companies, restaurants and supermarkets.

Original plans called for the facility to be expanded to take in 100 tons per day next year. The CEC grant will support that expansion, which is expected to be complete by early 2013. The first phase of development, which will create a 25-ton-per-day operation, is scheduled to be complete this summer.

In addition to producing biobased natural gas, the site will also produce 2 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year. According to Clean World Partners, that level of electricity production is enough to power 200 homes per year. The facility will also produce biobased natural gas for use in the transportation sector. The company noted that up to 1 million gallons of diesel could be displaced annually.

Atlas Disposal’s Renewable Natural Gas Fueling Station will use the biobased natural gas produced by the digestion system to fuel its clean-fuel fleet. Fuel distributed at the station will also power vehicles from area jurisdictions and agencies. Information released by Clean World Partners stated that the initial 25-ton-per-day operation will generate enough biogased natural gas to fuel approximately 80 school buses for a year.

“Clean World Partners is clearly demonstrating that its waste-recycling systems can be used in a wide range of situations,” said Energy Commissioner Carla Peterman.  “We’re pleased to support expansion of this new facility in Sacramento and are excited about its growing influence in the waste-recycling market.”

 

 

 

 

1 Responses

  1. Evan Chrapko

    2012-06-17

    1

    Fact-checking required: 100 tons/day (to be accomplished next year) would be far from "the largest commercial-scale, high solids anaerobic digestion system in the country." ref. Kansas project--biggest in the world See http://www.wpellc.com/index.asp?DocumentID=42 which is 100% based on technology licensed from www.HimarkBioGas.com .....a company that specializes in large scale high solids AD globally.

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