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UK team releases 10-step guide to pellet production

By Luke Geiver | June 15, 2012

A father and son team who own and operate PelHeat, a pellet mill development company based in Staffordshire, England, have created a 10-step guide explaining how pellets are produced. After receiving several inquiries into PelHeat’s small-scale pellet mills and the advantages of using pellets for small heating applications, Chris Scott, founder of the company, created a document explaining the process that includes information on the production process, pellet compositions, purchasing platforms and, why pellets are beneficial to the user.

PelHeat’s production process step-by-step guide includes information on the following:

1.  Size Reduction: Chippers/Shredders, Hammer Mills

 2.  Material Transportation: Fans, Cyclone Separators and Screw Augers

 3.  Drying Solutions: Rotary/Drum Dryers, Pipe Dryers

 4.  Mixing Solutions: Batch Mixers

 5.  Conditioning: Water and Steam Addition, Binders

 6.  Pellet Production: Round and Flat Die Pellet Mills

 7.  Sieving: Removing Fines

 8.  Cooling: Counter Flow Coolers

 9.  Pellet Transportation: Bucket Elevators

10. Bagging and Storage: Bags, Sacks and Silos

Along with the basics to the pellet production process, the team at PelHeat also provided a brief background of their experimentation with a mobile pellet mill that utilized a hammer mill, cyclone separator and a pellet mill all mounted on a trailer. The mobile unit was powered by a Perkins diesel engine, and although Scott said the unit proved to be unsuitable for sale, the team was able to leverage their experience into their company and assist others in mill buying process.

The informative document also discusses the difference between a flat die pellet mill and a ring die pellet mill, and the dangers of buying a PK/KL series mill made in China. According to the PelHeat team, although the mini mill offered in the PK/KL series is available and sometime is cheap, the mill is meant for producing animal feed out of low density grass and not for fuel pellet production purposes.

After receiving several inquiries into PelHeat’s small-scale pellet mills and the advantages of using pellets for small heating applications, Chris Scott, founder of the company, created a document explaining the process that includes information on the production process, pellet compositions, purchasing platforms and, why pellets are beneficial to the user.

PelHeat’s production process step-by-step guide includes information on the following:

1.  Size Reduction: Chippers/Shredders, Hammer Mills

 2.  Material Transportation: Fans, Cyclone Separators and Screw Augers

 3.  Drying Solutions: Rotary/Drum Dryers, Pipe Dryers

 4.  Mixing Solutions: Batch Mixers

 5.  Conditioning: Water and Steam Addition, Binders

 6.  Pellet Production: Round and Flat Die Pellet Mills

 7.  Sieving: Removing Fines

 8.  Cooling: Counter Flow Coolers

 9.  Pellet Transportation: Bucket Elevators

10. Bagging and Storage: Bags, Sacks and Silos

Along with the basics to the pellet production process, the team at PelHeat also provided a brief background of their experimentation with a mobile pellet mill that utilized a hammer mill, cyclone separator and a pellet mill all mounted on a trailer. The mobile unit was powered by a Perkins diesel engine, and although Scott said the unit proved to be unsuitable for sale, the team was able to leverage their experience into their company and assist others in mill buying process.

The informative document also discusses the difference between a flat die pellet mill and a ring die pellet mill, and the dangers of buying a PK/KL series mill made in China. According to the PelHeat team, although the mini mill offered in the PK/KL series is available and cheap, the mill is meant for producing animal feed out of low density grass and not for fuel pellet production purposes.

 

 

1 Responses

  1. Steve

    2012-07-03

    1

    Ist there a link to the Pellet Guide?

  2.  

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