FERC: US could to add 572 MW of biomass capacity by 2022

By Erin Voegele | February 08, 2019

A report recently issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission shows the U.S added 68 MW of biomass power last year. An additional 572 MW of biomass capacity could be installed by January 2022.

According to the report, the U.S. added 13 biomass units in 2019, with a combined capacity of 68 MW. In 2017, the U.S. added 27 biomass units with a combined capacity of 272 MW.

From January through December 2018, the U.S. added a total of 672 power generation units, with a combined capacity of 30,881 MW. In addition the biomass units, this included four coal units with a combined 10 MW of capacity, 103 natural gas units with a combined 20,048 MW of capacity, five nuclear units with a combined 350 MW of capacity, 25 oil units with a combined 37 MW of capacity, 33 water units with a combined 14 MW of capacity, 55 wind units with a combined 6,028 MW of capacity, four geothermal steam units with a combined 82 MW of capacity, 429 solar units with a combined 4,181 MW of capacity, two waste heat units with a combined 51 MW of capacity, and 33 units classified as “other” with a combined 5 MW of capacity.

As of the end of 2018, the U.S. had 16.16 gigawatts (GW) of biomass capacity in place, accounting for approximately 1.35 percent of total U.S. capacity. Overall, there was 1,196.42 GW of capacity in the U.S.

The FERC currently estimates the U.S. could add an additional 3,510 power generation units with a combined 266,331 MW of capacity by January 2022. This includes 53 biomass units with a combined 572 MW of capacity. Over the same time period, the FERC estimates 238 power generation units with a combined 36,487 MW of capacity could be retired. This includes 29 biomass units with a combined 186 MW of capacity.