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Researchers design microbes that make biofuels without sugar

By University of Wisconsin-Madison | July 03, 2012

With metabolically engineered microorganisms hungry for levulinic acid rather than sugar, a University of Wisconsin-Madison chemical and biological engineer aims to create more sustainable, cost-effective processes for converting biomass into high-energy-density hydrocarbon fuels.

Currently, commercial biofuels—for example, ethanol and biodiesel—are produced from such crops as sugarcane or corn, or derived from plant oils. However, existing production processes for these “first-generation” biofuels are energy-intensive and ill-suited to meet future demand for alternative transportation fuels.

Brian Pfleger, a UW-Madison assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering, is among an emerging group of researchers that is capitalizing on modern biotechnology tools to engineer systems that efficiently and sustainably produce “drop-in” fuels—advanced biofuels interchangeable with today’s fuels and compatible with existing infrastructure.

A synthetic biologist, Pfleger received a prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award from the National Science Foundation to support his research. With the award, Pfleger will study, engineer and test metabolic pathways in bacteria that can convert biomass to hydrocarbon fuels in a process that bypasses the difficult intermediate step of breaking down the natural sugars in plants.

Those sugars have a tendency to degrade into levulinic acid, which the U.S. DOE calls one of the top value-added chemicals from biomass. Exploiting that tendency, Pfleger will engineer an organism—for example, by adding or subtracting genes—that quickly and efficiently can break down levulinic acid into smaller molecules known as free fatty acids that, in turn, can be used to produce fuels and chemicals. This work complements advanced biofuel production research he has conducted at UW-Madison through the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center.

Pfleger’s research also leverages the expertise of colleague James Dumesic, the Steenbock Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at UW-Madison who has made groundbreaking advances in using catalysts to convert levulinic acid into high-energy liquid fuels. However, capitalizing on the power of synthetic biology, Pfleger can tailor microorganisms that can produce specific—or a wider range—of fuels and chemicals.

“In a catalytic sense, you make a mixture of things; a microbe makes a particular compound,” he said.

In addition to establishing a microbial fermentation facility for research and teaching, Pfleger is developing a laboratory-based course that will enable undergraduate seniors and graduate students to learn synthetic biology skills and techniques such as designing DNA molecules and incorporating those models into organisms.

This biochemical engineering laboratory course also will serve as a training ground for the UW-Madison iGEM team, a cross-disciplinary group of students who design functional biological systems to compete in the International Genetically Engineered Machine synthetic biology competition. Pfleger has been the team adviser since 2008.

He also will partner with the National Science Foundation-supported Delta Program at UW-Madison to develop lectures, case studies, and experiments for educating public audiences and kindergarten through undergraduate-level students about sustainability, biofuels and synthetic biology.

 

 

 

2 Responses

  1. Eddie

    2012-07-06

    1

    New process to produce Levulinic Acid for $.04-$.10 per pound makes this a winning option. http://www1.eere.energy.gov/manufacturing/industries_technologies/forest/pdfs/levulinic.pdf

  2. Daiana

    2012-08-01

    2

    Review by tmancill for Rating: I read this book cover-to-cover over the crosue of a couple of weeks. I'm new to the field of renewable energy, so you'll have to take my criticisms for what they are, a critique of the writing:1) The author frequently repeats himself, and sometimes goes so far to state that he is repeating himself, and that the reader should refer back to a previous section.2) Many of the references are so and so claims such and such or references to the Home Power magazine. It's great that the author cites his sources, but it often left me wondering if the author placed any stock in the claim being reported.3) The author frequently refers to his own house, which was designed from the ground up to use renewable energy. While this is neat, it doesn't seem applicable to readers who already own houses (with a 99% chance that they're not nearly as efficient, and that it's not possible to convert them).4) I would have enjoyed more information on solar power, since it seems to be the most applicable in urban and suburban areas. Instead, it received basically equal treatment alongside micro-hydroelectric and wind power.Still, it's a good book 3.5 stars and contains a number of references to other sources of information on the topic.

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